is it illegal to ride with a helmet that is over 10 year old

Heard some discussion lately about it being illegal in some states to ride with a helmet (even in good condition that is certified) that is over 10 years old.
Doing a search on various states roads sites found nothing on the matter other than to say that the rider must wear a helmet manufactured in accordance with and bearing the certification of the relative Australian/ New Zealand standard.

Anyone know for sure what the rules are?
 

Vince

Hero member
Never heard of that one, it must comply is all I know. I have heard various opinions about use-by dates for helmets from 5 years and up but legal age for replacement, nup . Bloody social media is overflowing with bullshit and spread by idiots.
 

Gerald

Hero member
How would any cop pulling you over know the age of the helmet? I've never seen a production date in a helmet. Would you have to carry the sales receipt with you, which only dates the time of purchase? In some European countries like Italy, you need to wear a certified helmet, with a ECE 22.05 sticker, but even then the lid could ancient.

Gerald
 

Tippie

Hero member
Location
Dr?bak, Norway
Helmets usually have production date recorded on them, often it is under the soft lining and hard to find. Discount helmets are often old stock that might have been on a shelf for years. The Shoei I use on the road has a message in it that it should be replaced after five years from first use and I can't find the manufacture date. My race Shoei has a date marking on the polystyrene liner, easy to see. For racing here they won't allow helmet more than ten years old from manufacture, if they can find a date. I doubt helmet age has any relation with road deaths, maybe coroners would check that, but it would be a bit late to fine the rider.
 

pf1

Hero member
Location
Portsmouth UK
I think this debate started up when the first polycarbonate helmets were made, they deteriorated quickly and were affected by many things. I recall my mate pensioning one of his off and so we did our own destructive testing on it. As I remember we nearly broke before the helmet did, it took some massive punishment before it gave in.
 

Cosi

Hero member
Location
Kingscliff
There is no such thing as a helmet that is in good condition after 10 years, yeah the shell may be still impervious but the foam inside will be fucked, floppy helmet? I guess it all depends on how much you value your head...
 

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
pf1 said:
I think this debate started up when the first polycarbonate helmets were made, they deteriorated quickly and were affected by many things. I recall my mate pensioning one of his off and so we did our own destructive testing on it. As I remember we nearly broke before the helmet did, it took some massive punishment before it gave in.

The shell breaking is part of the impact absorption mechanism.
Better a smashed shell than a smashed skull.

Paul
 

piranha-bro2

Hero member
Location
Melbourne
Paul Marx said:
The shell breaking is part of the impact absorption mechanism.
Better a smashed shell than a smashed skull.

Paul
Which is why I never did and never will ride with a polycarbonate helmet. They were cheap back in thew day and many were fooled into using them. I was forced to forego my Bell and use my boss's crap poly helmet to get through scrutineering before a race at Wanneroo (Perth, West Oz), because the Bell didn't have an Australian Standards sticker. I quickly returned to the pits and changed back to my Snell approved Bell!
 

sweetas

Hero member
Location
QLD
You used to be able to buy the silver/red Australian standard helmet sticker on ebay, card of 10 stickers was around $2.    There were so many imported helmets that didn't have the sticker, but were sold with it ?.. :mad:

 

wdietz186

Hero member
Location
Va. USA
The shell breaking isn't the issue with an aged out helmet, it's the foam/absorption layer inside. The liner is meant to compress and absorb the g force from the impact so your brain doesn't slam into your skull like a bug on a windscreen. The liner being foam deteriorates with exposure to the nasty crap in the  atmosphere along with cleaners and sweat/oils from the occupants head. Even the hi end helmets are cheap compared to a hospital visit for a head scan and/or rehab from having your bell rung.   
 

Reunited Chris

Junior member
Location
Sydney
I'm glad that I renew my helmet every 4 years, I would hate to think what the damage would have been had I been wearing an older helmet. Maybe a trip to the undertakers in a pine box or half my face missing, cheaper than the helicopter ride though.
$14,000.00 for the helicopter, $400 for a decent lid on special.
Looking at the damage to my helmet you've got to go with a full face helmet to protect the lower face.
 

Legs

Hero member
Would never ride in an 'open face' again. Seen too many carted off in an ambulance for facial reconstructions.
I know, it's personal choice etc.etc., but it's my choice. Plus, at 60 kph rain tickles, at 80 it stings and at 100 it downright hurts and I refuse to wear one of those 'skull' masks so beloved by our Harley riding brothers.
 
I was catapulted off my bike many years ago into the path of a car coming the other way. A full face helmet saved my life, an open face would have meant my certain demise... I don't know why folks even consider an open face. I have a top dollar Arai helmet of which every cent paid is great value for money. Don't save money in the helmet department!
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
I'm old enough to remember the days when full face helmets hadn't been invented. In my early days of motorcycling I wore an open face 'jet' style helmet with goggles. On wet days a scarf or bandana around the face offered some protection against the sting of rain. I crashed a few times with the old open face helmet (even had a head-on with a car in which I was catapulted over the top of the car and landed several metres the other side of it) but fortunately I never did a face-plant into anything - more by good luck than any ninja-style landing technique.

Then in 1968, the Bell Star full face helmet appeared on the scene. Shortly after that, everyone was making similar helmets. I bought a Shoei copy of the Bell Star in about 1970.

My old Stadium goggles are now displayed on my mantlepiece like a museum exhibit, but I no longer have my original helmet because some arsehole stole it.
 

Vince

Hero member
I had a 1/2 face and a full face at the same time years ago, don't remember why I had the half-face but I hated using it. Recently I bought a new Shoei Modular for eye-watering money, the odd thing is I like to wear it around to the local petrol station with the front up and open. It's by far the most comfortable helmet I have used. Having the front up takes me back to riding to the shower block at race sites not wearing a helmet or cruising around a campsite doing the same. I would never not wear a full face to a proper ride but still really enjoy going helmetless in the rare times I can.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HXpZGfXxDQ
 

laverdas

Hero member
Half face davida and a beard 🧔 for the last 46 years. Sooner have good vision than worry about a drop 💧 of rain ☔.
Nothing like the wind on your cheeks and the knats in your teeth
 
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