Laverda Jota Ownership, second time around. (ramblings)

Vince

Hero member
Mine has similar mods to quicken the steering,and I was carefull while testing on bumpy roads for tankslapper.None happenef so far
 
G

Grant

Guest
Cerianis are already shorter than Marzocchis and the distance from bottom of lower yoke to front axle is less.
Even more so on this bike.
So flexing of the forks under heavy braking is reduced.
Saying all that, the wheel/mudguard is closer to the centre downpipe, so who knows.

When the steering head on my bike was extended 60mm downwards and braced back to the frame it made the forks very flex-resistant, to the point no fork brace is required, as the distance between bottom of lower yoke and front axle was 60mm closer.
 

CLEMTOG

Hero member
"When the steering head on my bike was extended 60mm downwards and braced back to the frame it made the forks very flex-resistant, to the point no fork brace is required, as the distance between bottom of lower yoke and front axle was 60mm closer"

I have long had the notion that if you have a floating fork leg (on the right if callipers ahead of forks) then a fork brace should not ever be fitted, the "adjusting" and clamping of it will influence the pararlellity of the legs, but fine of you don't tighten the sliding adjustable bits.

CLEM
 

piranha-bro2

Hero member
Location
Melbourne
CLEMTOG said:
I have long had the notion that if you have a floating fork leg (on the right if callipers ahead of forks) then a fork brace should not ever be fitted, the "adjusting" and clamping of it will influence the pararlellity of the legs, but fine of you don't tighten the sliding adjustable bits.

CLEM

Wouldn't that indicate that your legs are not parallel, Clem? If the whole lot is dead straight then once the brace and the floating leg are pinched up tight, it should be a rigid assembly, non? But I am not a fan of fork braces , clamped around the slider or bolted in four places; any twist and the whole thing ends up binding.
 

motoddrob

Hero member
Location
S/W Australia
Motodd has had a Telefix fork brace fitted for 110000 kays. Forks work as they should. What's the problem with fork braces??
Also have the Marzo stanchions through the top yoke 25mm using off set cerani yokes. No problem with centre exhaust/mudguard
 

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
motoddrob said:
Motodd has had a Telefix fork brace fitted for 110000 kays. Forks work as they should. What's the problem with fork braces??
Also have the Marzo stanchions through the top yoke 25mm using off set cerani yokes. No problem with centre exhaust/mudguard

Did you say Motodd?
Paul
 

CLEMTOG

Hero member
"Wouldn't that indicate that your legs are not parallel, Clem? If the whole lot is dead straight then once the brace and the floating leg are pinched up tight, it should be a rigid assembly, non? But I am not a fan of fork braces , clamped around the slider or bolted in four places; any twist and the whole thing ends up binding"

you said it, bolt it up wrong and they bind, tightening of any bolt, nut or stud can cause twisting, movement or compression. most will fit one and not cause a problem, my thoughts are why did no fork manufacturer ever make and fit them? if you don't want twisting and diving under brake application you need these

CLEM
 

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cbertozz

Hero member
Location
Australia
Had the gear selector cover off today to check our roadside handy work was still holding. Need to get some Loctite 290. Gotta love that scissor jack though - so bloody useful.

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Came across a large deer sitting at the side of the road in the village today. Was clearly not 100%. Called council and they took to Rspca but euthenased.

Starter clutch getting progressively worse, rolling it downhill to start first thing  :LOL:
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
cbertozz said:
Came across a large deer sitting at the side of the road in the village today. Was clearly not 100%. Called council and they took to Rspca but euthenased.

Pity they can't euthanise them all. We don't need feral non-endemic animals in Australia.
 

motoddrob

Hero member
Location
S/W Australia
Dellortoman said:
Pity they can't euthanise them all. We don't need feral non-endemic animals in Australia.

Excuse my ignorance but were deer introduced to Oz?.We have a deer problem in our area, massive Squ KMs of bush. The population started with a few escaped from a local deer farm.
 

bazzee

Hero member
Location
Sydney
Apparently deer were introduced into the Royal National Park (Carlo has to travel through this on his way into or out of Bundeena) in 1906. They have been a problem there for a while.

bazzee
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
motoddrob said:
Excuse my ignorance but were deer introduced to Oz?

Yes, along with rabbits, foxes, rats, mice, wild pigs, blackbirds, starlings, and a whole bunch of other stuff including plants like poplar trees, willows, gorse bushes, etc. The early pommy settlers brought all that shit with them when they colonised Australia. The British policy at the time was "Make the world England", so they did their best to bring all the pommy plants and animals with them to make Australia look like home. Most (if not all) of those imports are now pests in Australia.
 

sideshow

Hero member
Yes , it was the same in NZ too.

They actually had a name for the group of people responsible for it there , not sure if it was the same in Australia , but in NZ it was called something along the lines of the Royal acclimatisation society.  They brought in plants and animals from all the colonies. Quite destructive. 
 

motoddrob

Hero member
Location
S/W Australia
sideshow said:
Yes , it was the same in NZ too.

They actually had a name for the group of people responsible for it there , not sure if it was the same in Australia , but in NZ it was called something along the lines of the Royal acclimatisation society.  They brought in plants and animals from all the colonies. Quite destructive.

And not to mention Possums from Oz. Got a possum fur beanie and soxs from NZ so they come to some use.
 

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
Dellortoman said:
Yes, along with rabbits, foxes, rats, mice, wild pigs, blackbirds, starlings, and a whole bunch of other stuff including plants like poplar trees, willows, gorse bushes, etc. The early pommy settlers brought all that shit with them when they colonised Australia. The British policy at the time was "Make the world England", so they did their best to bring all the pommy plants and animals with them to make Australia look like home. Most (if not all) of those imports are now pests in Australia.

And Europeans.

Paul
 
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