Author Topic: Importing a Bike  (Read 13399 times)

Offline markQLD

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2014, 02:19 »
thanks Andy.

& my shout, when i'm on my next northern safari.   :D

cheers,  Mark

Offline DavidH

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2014, 03:40 »
We have imported a few LAVs into AUS from the UK, Spain, Italy and Holland.
The greatest problem has been without a doubt the definition of 'clean' by AQIS.
Two shipments have been hit with the steam cleaner. 
In the first case, from Italy, everything plastic or rubber was destroyed as was a large amount of paint.
Photos and a written complaint got me nowhere, but getting the then local, independent Federal MP involved got action, and an apology and refund on the cleaning costs.

The second shipment from the UK was cleaned, but much more sympathetically and then only the tyres and mudguards.

From our perspective it comes down to the AQIS inspector.  Having been involved in providing technical assistance in inspection of new food and pharma equipment being imported,  the inspector has a degree of latitude, but not much as they operate under strict rules (as they should).  AS NEW is the catch phrase.
Get the tyres and under mudguards cleaned, make sure there are no cobwebs anywhere, nor any dirt or road grime.  Under the seat and behind side covers can be a real problem (as per previous post).  It is worth it, even if it costs you a small amount of money.

 

Offline Dellortoman

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2014, 04:24 »
In the first case, from Italy, everything plastic or rubber was destroyed as was a large amount of paint.

Blimey! What did they clean it with, a sand blaster?
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Offline AndyW

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2014, 04:40 »
I've found AQIS to be a little more lenient if the bike is crated: basically, they can't be bothered unpacking it (even though they charge $160 for it regardless). It does make sense to we sure there's no grime /mud on the tyres before it's crated and I think Giles organises for bikes to be washed before they are crated.

My '71 Tiger came from the USA 'loose' via Mainfreight and that was washed again by AQIS: luckily no damage was done other than a broken indicator somewhere between LA and TSV... I was annoyed at the time though in retrospect I can see I got off lightly.. :o

Always welcome up here Mark  :D

AndyW
'71 TR6 Tiger, '73 X-75, '73 3C, '74 3C, '75 SF2, '75 850T3 Cal, '75 T160V, '78 Mirage, 78 SSD Darmah '80 SD Darmah, '82 TR7/T, '83 Tenere, '85 R80g/s, 2017 MV F3 (Ago edition)

Offline markQLD

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2014, 05:36 »
my best advice for Australia, is having a mate work in customs, who has a mate work in quarantine !!

back in '85, when the Spondon frame was unloaded in the port of BrisVegas. yea, it was still along the Hamilton reach back then.
i got a call from my customs mate, so jumped in the trusty old Ford rusto ute, and went around and picked him up at lunchtime, and then we went over and picked up his mate from quarantine and headed down to the port.

now,, every wharfie we saw was not a happy chap.  they knew and we knew, but we just grumbled at each other, the crate was inspected and all the documentation was signed, and then the crate was eventually dropped into the back of the ute.  fortunately, from not too great a height !! and i drove back out of the port gate, with me customs and quarantine mates.
all too easy, and no farken goods & services tax.   :D

Offline Bottler

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2014, 07:37 »
Grant,

This is very timely for me. I am about to ship my Jota and Stelvio to Australia from South Africa. The bikes will be crated and go into a shipping container with the rest of our stuff. I have sorted the relevant permits etc but have one question. Wooden crates made up by the shippers or metal ones that were used to ship new bikes from the factory to the South African dealer? I put the Jota into a Ducati metal frame when I imported it from Australia and there was no damage at all.

Thanks in advance

Bottler
1978 (I think) Jota 6278
2013 Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX

Offline Grant

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2014, 08:17 »
Bottler, the wood used by the shipper has to comply with certain regulations.

"Packing:
Australian MAFF inspectors are very strict on the type of packing materials arriving into Australia. As such all of our packing materials are ISPM-15 compliant to ensure no problems are encountered on arrival. "


This is on top of cleaning the bike and possibly fumigation.

By the way, any bikes I transport to Shippio from Spain are thoroughly cleaned by me as part of the transport cost.
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Offline Bottler

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2014, 10:45 »
Thanks Grant, no problems with cleaning etc, and assuming the correct wood is used to meet quarantine rules. My question was more about the structural integrity of the crate, what would you recommend,  ie wood or steel?

Thanks
1978 (I think) Jota 6278
2013 Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX

Offline Grant

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2014, 10:56 »
No idea really.
I would think that a steel crate would give less issues with he Australian authorities but would it be heavier, don't know.
Does weight matter compared to the weight of the bike? Don't know.

I was involved in crating up a triple I sold to California some years back and I was given (FOC) a delivery packing crate for a Honda from the dealer.
I cut it to fit the triple and then plated the sides in lightweight plywood. No consideration was given to ISPM-15 compliance but it was several years ago and maybe that norm did not apply then.
Basically it was a mild steel skeleton that only had strength when bolted together. Even the thin plywood sheets reinforced it.

Find a local shipper in your country and ask his advice. Maybe he can only supply one type of crate.
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Offline DavidH

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2014, 11:32 »
The info Grant has provided re timber into AUS is correct.
What-ever you do, ensure it is compliant if a timber or timber and plywood crate is used.

Some bike manufacturers use a metal frame and cardboard sides and top.  Not sure how they get away with this as corrugated cardboard is a nightmare for greeblies investing themselves in there.

Cam, a more than liberal application of a steam cleaner will melt just about anything rubber or plastic, especially if set to maximum heat and held 5mm away.  A steam cleaner was used.  Not a cold/hot water high pressure cleaner such as a Karcher.
50-60 year old rubber on LAV's is not the same as 30-40 year old 'modern' LAV rubber, take my word, it literally melted. 

Our experience has been that the companies that advertise bike shipping in motorcycle magazines generally know how to fix the bikes in place so they do not move.  Some use timber baulks strategically placed, others use single or multi use strapping,

The greatest problem we encountered after AQIS here in AUS, is having something dropped onto our crate during transhipping.
Even tho it may cost you extra, we insist on direct shipment and timber framed crates.  The totally original 69S was saved by 4"x2" and 2' x 2" being used as the framing. Bent handlebars and smashed horn/dipswitch could be replaced.  The soya sauce from above had a very corrosive effect however on bare alloy!   


Offline AndyW

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2014, 12:36 »
Here's a typical crate as used by Shippio's preferred packers in London...

'71 TR6 Tiger, '73 X-75, '73 3C, '74 3C, '75 SF2, '75 850T3 Cal, '75 T160V, '78 Mirage, 78 SSD Darmah '80 SD Darmah, '82 TR7/T, '83 Tenere, '85 R80g/s, 2017 MV F3 (Ago edition)

Offline Dale

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2014, 17:18 »
Not so many problems coming form Oz to Europe.

Had a bike sent in an ex-Harley crate.
Steel frome with cardboard walls.

No problems at all.

Dale

Davo

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2014, 12:59 »
And the Australian Government states that they will assess the value of the bike and decide  the value for themselves if the stated value looks too dodgy. Always remember that the Customs department does have computers and can quickly assess and compare values of similar recent imports.

Offline Laverdaton

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #28 on: November 13, 2014, 13:18 »
This is an interesting thread on importing bikes. I have done this quite a bit for vintage MX bikes from the USA, so documentation isn't really a problem. The bikes are loaded into a container.

My question is: If I wanted to import a registered motorcycle from the US would I be liable to the taxes if I asked the seller to dismantle it - so that it became a CKD kit (completely knocked down).

A few years' ago I worked for an automotive company in the UK and we sent vehicles (partially dismantled) as CKD's to the US to avoid taxes/duty...etc. All legal of course.

Andy

Offline Grant

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Re: Importing a Bike
« Reply #29 on: November 13, 2014, 13:24 »
Andy, a few Laverdas ended up in the US that way (as 'spares') in order to get them in the country/state as well as reduce taxes.
Others have claimed different ages of bikes imported to the US to bypass age limits and so on.

Some things are better left off an open forum though...
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