LaverdaForum

Laverda Forum => Hints and Tips/WIKI => Topic started by: Grant on November 08, 2014, 08:24

Title: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 08, 2014, 08:24
There is a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation about importing a bike. Several folk on the forum have done it but I am sure there may be several more who would consider it if they understood the system better.

I had a discussion with Giles, the shipper (Shippio) I usually use and he kindly agreed to map out the details of importing a bike. He works out of the UK and can sea or air freight anywhere in the world.

Note:
This is not a hard sell, merely a detailed explanation with examples of what is involved in importing a bike to your country.
You are free to use any shipper you want, or any bike transport company you want. You are not tied to Shippio or me.


I asked Giles to cover 3 main areas:

- Importing a bike into the US
- Importing a bike into Australia
- Importing a bike into the EU (in this case from the US)



I will summarise below what he wrote:

Importing into the USA:

Restrictions:
Providing the vehicle is over 25 years old, there are no restrictions on permanently importing into the USA. If the vehicle is under 25 years old, then only race or off-road vehicles may be permanently imported.

Packing - The USA is very strict on the type of packing materials arriving into the country. As such all of our packing materials are ISPM-15 compliant to ensure no problems are encountered on arrival.   

Documentation Requirements: 
Passport photo page 
Bill of Sale 
Registration document
 
Shipping Process:
Your motorcycle can be collected from across the European Union by fully enclosed motorcycle truck or you are welcome to have the motorcycle delivered into one of our depots. 
We then have your motorcycle professional packed into a custom wooden crate to ensure maximum protection during shipment. Your crated motorcycle is then shipped by ocean or airfreighted directly into US terminal or airport. Our US agent will then take over to look after the local US formalities. This can include as much or little as you prefer. Some customer prefer for their motorcycle to have the complete treatment, delivered to their door rolling ready to go. Others may prefer to collect still crated from their local terminal. 
We can tailor to your requirements. 

Pricing:
Vehicle shipping to the USA is very cost effective and it’s actually one of the cheapest and easiest destinations. Ocean shipping can even be organised to US inland terminals as shipping lines automatically transport inland by rail. Often airfreight should be considered as pricing may be lower than you expect. 

Pricing example:

Crating & shipment of a Laverda 750 to arrival into New York ocean terminal:   
GBP 620

US Terminal Handling 
GBP 57

US Customs Clearances 
USD 425

US Port Charges & Handling 
USD 240

US Import Tax 
0.125%* of the value of the bike 
0.3464%* on the value of the bike ( Min $25 / Max $485) 
This extra tax is only for ocean freight shipments (Harbour Maintenance Fee) 
* Depending on value

US Import Duty:
2.5%* if the bike is 699cc or over 
FREE if the bike is 650cc or under 
* Depending on engine and value
 
US Import Bonds:   
$4.50 per $1000 value of the bike x 3 ( Min $75 ) 
Example US$10,000 value bike = 10 x $4.50 x 3 =   USD 135   

Optional additions: 
Transit insurance – to cover for loss or damage during transit 
Delivery un-crated to door in the USA by fully enclosed motorcycle truck.   

Importing into Australia

Restrictions:
Providing the vehicle was manufactured before 1st January 1989 there are few problems experienced in permanently importing into Australia. Later vehicles may be imported, but only if you owned and used them for a period of 12 months outside of Australia.

Quarantine: 
Many customers worry about the cleanliness regulations when importing a vehicle into Australia. The inspectors don’t insist on fumigation of every vehicle that arrives and many have no problems. They are specifically looking for signs of dust, seeds or soil with specific attention to often forgotten areas of a motorcycle. These include underneath the seats and under mud guards. 
A fumigation certificate prior to shipment is no guarantee that Australian Quarantine inspectors won’t insist on additional fumigation on arrival. Many customers choose to have their vehicle clean before shipment, then take the chance of fumigation charges on arrival. These are typically under AUD 200.

Packing:
Australian MAFF inspectors are very strict on the type of packing materials arriving into Australia. As such all of our packing materials are ISPM-15 compliant to ensure no problems are encountered on arrival.   

Documentation Requirements: 
Passport photo page 
Bill of Sale 
Registration document 
Australian Import Approval Certificate (https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/vehicles/imports/new.aspx#anc_application)

Shipping Process:
Your motorcycle can be collected from across the European Union by fully enclosed motorcycle truck or you are welcome to have the bike delivered into one of our depots. 
We then have your motorcycle professional packed into a custom wooden crate to ensure maximum protection during shipment. Your crated motorcycle is then shipped by ocean or airfreighted directly into Australian terminal or airport. Our Australian agent will then take over to look after the local formalities on arrival. This can include as much or little as you prefer. Some customer prefer for their motorcycle to have the complete treatment, delivered to their door rolling ready to go. Others may prefer to collect still crated from their local terminal in either Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide or Perth.
We can tailor to your requirements.

Pricing:
Vehicle shipping to Australia is certainly cost effective providing you obtain your import approval certificate. Often airfreight should be considered as pricing may be lower than you expect.   
Pricing example:
Crating & shipment of a Laverda 750 to arrival into Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth or Brisbane ocean terminal:   
GBP 645

Terminal Handling & Arrival Charges (Australian) 
AUD 555

Customs Clearances (Australian) 
AUD 150

Quarantine Charges (Australian) o This excludes fumigation charges. Fumigation is not always required and depends on the inspecting officer 
AUD 255

Import Tax (GST) 
10% of CIF value* 
CIF is the combined value of the motorcycle, shipping costs and any insurance policies. 
For more information please see: http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page4371.asp   
* Depends on value
 
Import Duty: 
Free for motorcycles 
For more information please see: http://www.customs.gov.au/site/page4371.asp   

Optional additions: 
Transit insurance – to cover for loss or damage during transit 
Delivery to door in Australia by fully enclosed motorcycle truck

Importing a bike into the EU (in this case from the US)

Restrictions:
There are no restrictions on permanently importing motorcycles from the USA into Europe and the age of the motorcycle will dictate the amount of Duties/taxes charged on import into the EU.
 
Documentation Requirements: 
Passport photo page (New Owner) 
Bill of Sale (Notarised) 
Registration document (Original US Title)

Shipping Process:
1.       Collection in the USA – Optional:
Most Vehicles tend to be shipped from Chicago, Seattle, Los Angeles, Houston, Miami, Savannah or New York and will need to be transported to the port for loading. If the seller is unable to drop the bike into a local depot, we can certainly arrange collection from across the USA by fully enclosed motorcycle truck for you.  A full condition report will be made on collection for your records. 

2.       Loading, shipping, UK import customs clearances and local charges:
On arrival of your motorcycle into one of the depots, your motorcycle will be photographed and professionally loaded into a vehicle shipping container for shipment to arrival into UK port. We will then clear through customs ready for you to collect from Felixstowe, GB (We can arrange forward delivery to your address if required). 
You will need to allow a realistic shipping time of between 4 -7 weeks from the USA depending on the location. Many people quote less, but US customs authorities alone can take over 14 days simply to authorise export of the motorcycle from the USA.

3.       Customs Duties & Taxes (HMRC Charges):
You will also need to pay any import duties and VAT on import of the motorcycles into the EU. Providing your motorcycle is over 30 years old we may be able to import at the reduced levels of zero duty and 5% VAT.
These are calculated as follows:

Duty and VAT:
Duty – Motorcycle 250cc and under: 8%
Duty – Motorcycle over 250cc: 6%
VAT – Vehicle less than 30 years old: 20% of value of vehicle + all shipping costs + Duty
VAT – Vehicle 30 years and over  (Please note that no Duty is levied either): 5% of value of vehicle + all shipping costs

Please note: 
We organise the payment of these to HMRC for you and we will add on a 2.5% charge on the monies paid. 
VAT Adjustment factors may also apply 
We may be able to obtain a customs ruling for either ‘collectors’ or ‘historic’ vehicles manufactured after 1950 so that they may be imported duty free and at the lower VAT level. 
Further detail may be found at http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/vat/sectors/consumers/personal- vehicles.htm#1 

4.       Delivery/Transport of the motorcycle across the EU – Optional:
You are quite welcome to collect your motorcycle from Felixstowe, GB, or alternatively we can deliver by fully enclosed motorcycle truck to your address across the UK or Europe. 
We can tailor to your requirements.   

Pricing:
Vehicle shipping from the USA is very cost effective, especially when you take into account the reduced duty/vat charged on vehicles over 30 years old.

Pricing example:

Collection of a Laverda 750 motorcycle from Washington DC to our New York depot by fully enclosed motorcycle truck 
GBP 285

Loading, shipping, UK import customs clearances and local charges: 
GBP 695

Customs Duties & Taxes (VAT) 
Depending on value

Delivery/Transport of the motorcycle Felixstowe, GB to Paris, FR 
GBP 295   

Optional additions: 
Transit insurance: 
To cover for loss or damage during transit to the motorcycles full value 
Procurement Service:
If you find a motorcycle of interest, as well as a shipping service, we can also offer a procurement option to control when funds are paid to a seller in order to give you maximum peace of mind.   

Shippio Ltd, 75 High Street, Wollaston, Northamptonshire, NN29 7QE 
T: +44 (0) 1604 419 815   
email: admin@shippio.com
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: blab on November 08, 2014, 08:36
So thats about $5K to import your $30k Jota to Oz.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Yogi on November 08, 2014, 10:31
I have used Giles on three occasions and found his service to be very good. On each occasion he arranged for bike and parts to be picked up from seller, and crated.  Last bike was the Atlas and only problem was that the bike was not cleaned well enough - that meant that quarantine got to steam pressure clean the bike at something like 4000psi, which took a fair bit of paint off and damaged sheathing on ignition wiring - the bloke using the pressure cleaner had no idea what he was doing (got way too close to everything with nozzle, as learners always do) which was 'annoying'.  When I complained they waived the extra charges, which were about $2-300...  Lesson is, do insist and make sure that the bike is thoroughly cleaned of dirt and exterior grease, paying particular attention to under mudguards, wheels and engine.  Once it gets here and is deemed dirty, you do not get a chance to nominate who cleans it - the quarantine folk have all the power at that stage.

That said, I would always use Giles for any motorcycle import.

Yogi
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Yogi on November 08, 2014, 10:37
So thats about $5K to import your $30k Jota to Oz.

Only if you paid $30k for it... sometimes you can pick up a real bargain bike in great condition for a lot less..
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: blab on November 08, 2014, 10:54
I realise that Yoges,GST is the killer on high end imports.10% of your total price adds ,well 10 %.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 08, 2014, 10:58
Well, declare a low value then...
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: blab on November 08, 2014, 11:11
Well, declare a low value then...
[/quote
Who states the value ? Buyer or seller ?
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 08, 2014, 11:17
Want me to spell it out?
Use common sense.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: blab on November 08, 2014, 11:20
Depends who the seller is I suppose.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Dellortoman on November 08, 2014, 21:11
Just be careful with declaring a low value. It can bite you in the arse.

A friend of mine declared a low value on a bike to reduce tax charges. Then he went to insure it at its actual value and the insurance company queried the different valuations on his paperwork. He explained the reason and the they refused his insurance on the grounds that he had just admitted to committing fraud. Their opinion being that if he was prepared to defraud the government, he might defraud an insurer. He was lucky that they didn't report him to the police. If you get refused insurance by one company, others generally won't touch you either. He is now unable to insure any of his bikes.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Yogi on November 08, 2014, 21:30
I heard that some buyers and some sellers have the audacity to agree to two different bills of sale.

Just saying..
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: laverlesmains on November 08, 2014, 23:26
Hey Grant

Thanks for taking the time to post the info.


Cheers, Tim
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: AndyW on November 08, 2014, 23:43
So thats about $5K to import your $30k Jota to Oz.

It's closer to $2500 as your $30k Jota is only worth $30k once it arrives in Australia. Have to admit the cost is going up all the time as the AUD$ slides...

I notice Shippio have dropped their freight charge by £100. Also, they do pack the bikes in the crates very well and don't mind if you want to use up excess space with other spares etc..
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: markQLD on November 09, 2014, 01:52
ay Andy,  you well know i hold you personally responsible for forcing me to purchase another Laverda motor-bicycle.
no, i didn't 'need' another, but when someone was bidding on an ex USA, very low mileage SF2, located down in Vic.
i can recall saying to Red, "some poofta is gunna get it for under 10 grand".
& the poofta turned out to be a pom.   ::)   and it was indeed a 'new' 40 year old Laverda.  all standard and clean.

anyhow, within a year, Shamrock had put a price on another very low mileage SF2. so i just had to have it !!
it was also standard and clean. & only 4,791 miles on the clock.
(https://www.laverdaforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi1234.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fff417%2FmarkQLD%2F1-zzz%2FSeFFie-costs-02.jpg&hash=67b46f45979da0496ecfebc95234bb3f)
it's been worth every dollar.  (well no, but let's not talk about the poofta government fees & farken charges !! )
SeFFie now has clocked up 5,792 miles and is running sweet as.  just ask Sweetas, ay.   8)
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: AndyW on November 09, 2014, 02:05
 (congrats) (congrats) (congrats)
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: markQLD on November 09, 2014, 02:19
thanks Andy.

& my shout, when i'm on my next northern safari.   :D

cheers,  Mark
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: DavidH on November 09, 2014, 03:40
We have imported a few LAVs into AUS from the UK, Spain, Italy and Holland.
The greatest problem has been without a doubt the definition of 'clean' by AQIS.
Two shipments have been hit with the steam cleaner. 
In the first case, from Italy, everything plastic or rubber was destroyed as was a large amount of paint.
Photos and a written complaint got me nowhere, but getting the then local, independent Federal MP involved got action, and an apology and refund on the cleaning costs.

The second shipment from the UK was cleaned, but much more sympathetically and then only the tyres and mudguards.

From our perspective it comes down to the AQIS inspector.  Having been involved in providing technical assistance in inspection of new food and pharma equipment being imported,  the inspector has a degree of latitude, but not much as they operate under strict rules (as they should).  AS NEW is the catch phrase.
Get the tyres and under mudguards cleaned, make sure there are no cobwebs anywhere, nor any dirt or road grime.  Under the seat and behind side covers can be a real problem (as per previous post).  It is worth it, even if it costs you a small amount of money.

 
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Dellortoman on November 09, 2014, 04:24
In the first case, from Italy, everything plastic or rubber was destroyed as was a large amount of paint.

Blimey! What did they clean it with, a sand blaster?
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: AndyW on November 09, 2014, 04:40
I've found AQIS to be a little more lenient if the bike is crated: basically, they can't be bothered unpacking it (even though they charge $160 for it regardless). It does make sense to we sure there's no grime /mud on the tyres before it's crated and I think Giles organises for bikes to be washed before they are crated.

My '71 Tiger came from the USA 'loose' via Mainfreight and that was washed again by AQIS: luckily no damage was done other than a broken indicator somewhere between LA and TSV... I was annoyed at the time though in retrospect I can see I got off lightly.. :o

Always welcome up here Mark  :D

AndyW
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: markQLD on November 09, 2014, 05:36
my best advice for Australia, is having a mate work in customs, who has a mate work in quarantine !!

back in '85, when the Spondon frame was unloaded in the port of BrisVegas. yea, it was still along the Hamilton reach back then.
i got a call from my customs mate, so jumped in the trusty old Ford rusto ute, and went around and picked him up at lunchtime, and then we went over and picked up his mate from quarantine and headed down to the port.

now,, every wharfie we saw was not a happy chap.  they knew and we knew, but we just grumbled at each other, the crate was inspected and all the documentation was signed, and then the crate was eventually dropped into the back of the ute.  fortunately, from not too great a height !! and i drove back out of the port gate, with me customs and quarantine mates.
all too easy, and no farken goods & services tax.   :D
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Bottler on November 09, 2014, 07:37
Grant,

This is very timely for me. I am about to ship my Jota and Stelvio to Australia from South Africa. The bikes will be crated and go into a shipping container with the rest of our stuff. I have sorted the relevant permits etc but have one question. Wooden crates made up by the shippers or metal ones that were used to ship new bikes from the factory to the South African dealer? I put the Jota into a Ducati metal frame when I imported it from Australia and there was no damage at all.

Thanks in advance

Bottler
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 09, 2014, 08:17
Bottler, the wood used by the shipper has to comply with certain regulations.

"Packing:
Australian MAFF inspectors are very strict on the type of packing materials arriving into Australia. As such all of our packing materials are ISPM-15 compliant to ensure no problems are encountered on arrival. "


This is on top of cleaning the bike and possibly fumigation.

By the way, any bikes I transport to Shippio from Spain are thoroughly cleaned by me as part of the transport cost.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Bottler on November 09, 2014, 10:45
Thanks Grant, no problems with cleaning etc, and assuming the correct wood is used to meet quarantine rules. My question was more about the structural integrity of the crate, what would you recommend,  ie wood or steel?

Thanks
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 09, 2014, 10:56
No idea really.
I would think that a steel crate would give less issues with he Australian authorities but would it be heavier, don't know.
Does weight matter compared to the weight of the bike? Don't know.

I was involved in crating up a triple I sold to California some years back and I was given (FOC) a delivery packing crate for a Honda from the dealer.
I cut it to fit the triple and then plated the sides in lightweight plywood. No consideration was given to ISPM-15 compliance but it was several years ago and maybe that norm did not apply then.
Basically it was a mild steel skeleton that only had strength when bolted together. Even the thin plywood sheets reinforced it.

Find a local shipper in your country and ask his advice. Maybe he can only supply one type of crate.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: DavidH on November 09, 2014, 11:32
The info Grant has provided re timber into AUS is correct.
What-ever you do, ensure it is compliant if a timber or timber and plywood crate is used.

Some bike manufacturers use a metal frame and cardboard sides and top.  Not sure how they get away with this as corrugated cardboard is a nightmare for greeblies investing themselves in there.

Cam, a more than liberal application of a steam cleaner will melt just about anything rubber or plastic, especially if set to maximum heat and held 5mm away.  A steam cleaner was used.  Not a cold/hot water high pressure cleaner such as a Karcher.
50-60 year old rubber on LAV's is not the same as 30-40 year old 'modern' LAV rubber, take my word, it literally melted. 

Our experience has been that the companies that advertise bike shipping in motorcycle magazines generally know how to fix the bikes in place so they do not move.  Some use timber baulks strategically placed, others use single or multi use strapping,

The greatest problem we encountered after AQIS here in AUS, is having something dropped onto our crate during transhipping.
Even tho it may cost you extra, we insist on direct shipment and timber framed crates.  The totally original 69S was saved by 4"x2" and 2' x 2" being used as the framing. Bent handlebars and smashed horn/dipswitch could be replaced.  The soya sauce from above had a very corrosive effect however on bare alloy!   

Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: AndyW on November 09, 2014, 12:36
Here's a typical crate as used by Shippio's preferred packers in London...

Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Dale on November 09, 2014, 17:18
Not so many problems coming form Oz to Europe.

Had a bike sent in an ex-Harley crate.
Steel frome with cardboard walls.

No problems at all.

Dale
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Davo on November 12, 2014, 12:59
And the Australian Government states that they will assess the value of the bike and decide  the value for themselves if the stated value looks too dodgy. Always remember that the Customs department does have computers and can quickly assess and compare values of similar recent imports.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Laverdaton on November 13, 2014, 13:18
This is an interesting thread on importing bikes. I have done this quite a bit for vintage MX bikes from the USA, so documentation isn't really a problem. The bikes are loaded into a container.

My question is: If I wanted to import a registered motorcycle from the US would I be liable to the taxes if I asked the seller to dismantle it - so that it became a CKD kit (completely knocked down).

A few years' ago I worked for an automotive company in the UK and we sent vehicles (partially dismantled) as CKD's to the US to avoid taxes/duty...etc. All legal of course.

Andy
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on November 13, 2014, 13:24
Andy, a few Laverdas ended up in the US that way (as 'spares') in order to get them in the country/state as well as reduce taxes.
Others have claimed different ages of bikes imported to the US to bypass age limits and so on.

Some things are better left off an open forum though...
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: jotajoe on November 13, 2014, 15:57
Thanks Grant, no problems with cleaning etc, and assuming the correct wood is used to meet quarantine rules. My question was more about the structural integrity of the crate, what would you recommend,  ie wood or steel?

Thanks


I work in Export Packaging .

For Australia or China,

Use a plywood case, make the framing from plywood and the bearers from composite particle type board. Use hold down D rings and ratchet straps to hold the bike down to the base. Screw the sides and ends and lid on with decent screws.

Here is some information from AU Govt site.:-

"What wood packaging material does ISPM 15 apply to?"

ISPM 15 can be applied to any solid wood packaging material. The following products are exempt: wood packaging made wholly of wood-based products such as plywood and veneer, reconstituted wood products (particle board, chipboard, hardboard (masonite) oriented strand board, high density fibre board, and medium density fibre board) or products created using glue, heat and pressure or a combination of these.

If I was shipping a bike to Australia I would remove the Wheels and mudguard and steam clean them off the bike until they gleam .I would ensure they are very dry and  I would leave them bagged and off the bike in transit inside the case. I would not want Government operatives  causing massive damage to a bike for the sake of a couple of hours work. The case would also be smaller which may save on shipping costs .


Joe
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Davo on November 19, 2014, 11:36
my best advice for Australia, is having a mate work in customs, who has a mate work in quarantine !!

back in '85, ...

... and no farken goods & services tax.   :D

Could well be because "back in '85" there was no farken GST. Was brought in by the Teflon Kid in 2000, after having told the electorate we would never have one.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Davo on November 19, 2014, 11:42

My question is: If I wanted to import a registered motorcycle from the US would I be liable to the taxes if I asked the seller to dismantle it - so that it became a CKD kit (completely knocked down)

Andy

Yes

www.customs.gov.au/site/content2304.asp
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: Grant on March 19, 2019, 09:26
I thought I would bring this back to the top of the page in case anyone hadn't seen it.
Since it was written maybe the rules have changed, I'm thinking of Australia here and asbestos removal, but it is still agood guide nd cuts through a lot of the BS often spoken about importing.
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: oldorange on April 24, 2019, 21:27
Bumping this one up. Has anyone imported a bike from Canada to the US recently?
Title: Re: Importing a Bike
Post by: earemike on May 04, 2019, 11:11
Brought two 850 Guzzi’s into Australia recently, major paranoia over asbestos - they can detain at my expense but supporting evidence helped get them through.

Over 5 grand in fees set me on my arse.

Be worth it when I get one on the road 😬