Author Topic: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?  (Read 17470 times)

Offline Gerald

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2011, 21:33 »
[quote author=John B link=topic=83184.msg178774#msg178774 date=131893991
The shop foreman passing by admonished me never to do this as it caused problems with condensation inside the motor.

another old wives' tale :laugh: engines can go from one temperature extreme to another within seconds in normal riding condition and don't suffer one bit! what a dipshit!
__o
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Offline Laverdalothar

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2011, 22:01 »
There was a video linked in this forum where some cleaned the bike with WD 40 and a brush, afterwards with some brake cleaner spray. I tried that and it really works great!! Thinking it through, it makes a lot of sense: most dirt on the bike is oil- or grease based. This mixes best with something on a similar base, like diesel, oil or spray- Oil like WD 40. Try it, you will be surprised how good it works. I was... ;)
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Offline Xav

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2011, 22:33 »

I'm going to take my 100psi, 7 bar Karcher and use that. Yes, I know it cuts deep grooves in my Indian stone patio if I get too close, but with no alternative what's to do......
I'll take off the tank and wrap the electrics and anything else important with all the cling film Coxy keeps sending me. ::)
I'll buy some sort of chemical cleaner and suck it up with the Karcher inlet pipe to mix with the water. I'll not get to close, but of course I'll do a test bit first that is out of site. I'll start the engine but ensure it does not get too hot and I'll jet quickly over each area, ensuring the jet is generally downwards and does not point directly at any joints, connections or nuts and bolts.
I will be careful and I will start on the least setting before I pump her up and blast the living daylights out of her.
Anyone any objections or hints?
Cheers
Chris

Hi Chris and all

Cleaning with your Kärcher is not a problem, especially with your idea to protect the electric parts (and do not forget carburettors) with the clingfilm.

But, do not put your chemical cleaner in the pipe of Kärcher, and especially not on a warm engine, a chemical cleaner must not dry

It is necessary to mix your chemical cleaner with some water and to put this solution in a typical atomizer atomizer of garden or domestic atomizer

You pulverize abundantly your parts to be cleaned, and rinse with your Kärcher, without insisting on the fragile parts (it is possible to put warm water (about 30/35 °) by the Kärcher, it's a good help)

You can practise a cleaning of the engine in this way with no problem at all. The only attention which it is necessary to have, is the quality of the chemical cleaner. Neither too acid nor too alkaline

lemonjelly

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2011, 22:48 »
There was a video linked in this forum where some cleaned the bike with WD 40 and a brush, afterwards with some brake cleaner spray. I tried that and it really works great!! Thinking it through, it makes a lot of sense: most dirt on the bike is oil- or grease based. This mixes best with something on a similar base, like diesel, oil or spray- Oil like WD 40. Try it, you will be surprised how good it works. I was... ;)

True Lothar,I always wipe off the chain oil off my rims with WD40 and a cloth.Quick and clean

LJ

Offline Xav

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2011, 23:01 »

Was wondering about this also - how about a steam cleaner :-\

Last week I was on a major exhibition of the piece and automotive equipment, and we received our stand a guy from Montreal who also sells steam devices on Canadian territory

(made in Korea) http://www.sjecorp.com/system/usMainpage


We discussed it, and we agree to say that the process is interesting. But the main argument of this system is that the water consumption is small.

It is anyway necessary to spend a blow of microfiber on the parts to be cleaned as carosserie (bodywork ?), with risk of microstripes (microscratches?).

I have not tried this type of system on engines yet, but I think that that has a potential of interesting result.

Nevertheless, the classic system of high-pressure wash remains in my opinion the best


Offline Spub

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2011, 23:25 »
You Brits infatuation with campy American pop culture is troubling.....
1982 Laverda Jota 180 #7807;  1977 Ducati 900SS,1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona; 2010 KTM Adventure 990; 74 Laverda SFC #17188, 1983 Moto Morini 500 SEI V Sport

Pasadena, California, Left Coast, US of A

Offline DoC!

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2011, 04:26 »
Well it shouldn't be troubling at all, since some people do have to live and work with dumb redneck drillers!
Anyhow, many thanks to all the other interesting, and more to the point, pertinent replies to my post.

Cheers guys (ooooo, that might sound too campy to some)  :-*
2x Red Laverda Jota 120 1982, Red RGS 120 1984, Black (and gold) Corsa 120 1984, Blue Series 2 572cc Atlas. Wee Red 124cc Uno. Another 124cc Uno in boxes.
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Offline jotajoe

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2011, 14:25 »
There was a video linked in this forum where some cleaned the bike with WD 40 and a brush, afterwards with some brake cleaner spray. I tried that and it really works great!! Thinking it through, it makes a lot of sense: most dirt on the bike is oil- or grease based. This mixes best with something on a similar base, like diesel, oil or spray- Oil like WD 40. Try it, you will be surprised how good it works. I was... ;)

I'll go with this one.

I wouldn't even think about jet washing or steam cleaning a motorcycle...The electrics,,The bearings....oooh no no no that's just Kriminal...

Brake cleaner evaporates very quickly so is good for nooks and crannies. I have a feeling that I read it can turn into a very very toxic chemical if sprayed onto hot components like exhausts...perfectly ok tho if the bike is cool.

I'd use gunk underneath..in the sump area..and a bucket with water in and a small brush to rinse it off.

joe





NB
Hazards of Chlorinated Brake Cleaner
By Robin Reichert, eHow Contributor

updated November 30, 2010

    Print this article

Related Searches:

    Health Safety
    Effects Water

        Automotive mechanics need to know about work-related chemical hazards.

        Chlorinated brake cleaner solvents have been used in automotive repair shops across the United States. Exposure to intense heat, caused by hot engine parts or a welding torch, can break down chlorinated solvents--such as brake cleaner--into a number of toxic compounds, according to Broward County Florida Pollution Prevention. The most toxic compounds found in chlorinated solvents include carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethane and chlorobenzene. The National Institutes of Health states that these toxic compounds, alone or in combination, may cause liver, kidney and brain damage.
    Carbon Tetrachloride

        Acute exposure to carbon tetrachloride through inhalation or oral ingestion can cause liver damage, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The liver of an exposed person may swell and become tender to the touch. Enzyme levels can change and you may suffer from jaundice, which is yellowing of the skin and eyes that results from the accumulation of toxins in the skin when the liver doesn't function properly. Carbon tetrachloride may also damage the kidneys and result in nephritis, nephrosis and proteinuria. Workers exposed to carbon tetrachloride have experienced nausea, vomiting, headaches, lethargy and general weakness.
    Trichloroethane

        People exposed to trichloroethane reported burning and whitening of exposed skin, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. No human studies are reported, but according to the EPA, animals exposed to trichloroethane suffered injury to the liver, kidneys and central nervous system following inhalation and ingestion of the compound. The California Environmental Protection Agency limits human exposure to trichloroethane to 0.004 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day, based on the compound's damaging effects on the livers of rats. The EPA is confident that lifetime exposures above the recommended daily exposure limits may cause adverse unknown health effects.
    Chlorobenzene

        Workers exposed to chlorobenzene may suffer from body numbness, headaches, nausea and vomiting. Workers have reported nervous system effects such as weakness in body functions. The EPA reports that exposure to high levels of chlorobenzene can cause severe liver, kidney and brain damage. Acute exposure to the chemical can cause unconsciousness and tremors. The effects of chlorobenzene on children can be particularly harsh. Children who ingest chlorobenzene may become unconscious, turn blue and experience muscle spasms. The Centers for Disease Control and EPA both state that long-term exposure to chlorobenzene can cause injury to the central nervous system, which can result in numbness, hypersensitivity to stimulus (hyperesthesia), muscle spasms, headaches and irritation to the upper respiratory tract.


Read more: Hazards of Chlorinated Brake Cleaner | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7426582_hazards-chlorinated-brake-cleaner.html#ixzz1bQGnvnoS
« Last Edit: October 21, 2011, 14:30 by jotajoe »
Jotajoe

Offline DoC!

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2011, 14:41 »
Quote
may suffer from body numbness, headaches, nausea and vomiting. Workers have reported nervous system effects such as weakness in body functions. The EPA reports that exposure to high levels can cause severe liver, kidney and brain damage. Acute exposure to the chemical can cause unconsciousness and tremors.

Just like drinking shite lager then eh!

Thanks for the contribution though Joe. I like the idea of WD 40, gunk and some brushes. Keep it on the safe side with my future pension pot eh!
2x Red Laverda Jota 120 1982, Red RGS 120 1984, Black (and gold) Corsa 120 1984, Blue Series 2 572cc Atlas. Wee Red 124cc Uno. Another 124cc Uno in boxes.
Black Honda Blackbird 1100.

BEER: Helping ugly people like Cosi have sex since 1892! :)

Online Paul H

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2011, 14:42 »
Aldi own brand 'chain cleaner'. Brilliant. It's as penetrating as brake cleaner, but evaps slower, so you can dab the still-wet area with paper towel and draw the muck off. Smokers toothbrushes are nice a stiff, and cheap. Hag.

Offline jotajoe

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2011, 22:59 »
In short ..keep it simple and lots of elbow grease : )
Jotajoe

Offline Paul LeClair

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #26 on: October 22, 2011, 00:54 »
Quote
may suffer from body numbness, headaches, nausea and vomiting. Workers have reported nervous system effects such as weakness in body functions. The EPA reports that exposure to high levels can cause severe liver, kidney and brain damage. Acute exposure to the chemical can cause unconsciousness and tremors.

Just like drinking shite lager then eh!

Thanks for the contribution though Joe. I like the idea of WD 40, gunk and some brushes. Keep it on the safe side with my future pension pot eh!


Hi DoC!

if you REALLY want a clean motor using brushes on it while still in the frame, I can highly recomend these cleaning brushes....

http://www.machinerycleanery.com/

not inexpensive, but probably the best in the world foryour purpose. I bought a complete set a couple of years ago, they work incredibly well, and last a very long time.

Paul LeClair
Paul LeClair
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
79 1200 Mirage, 82 1200 Mirage, 84 RGS Executive, and various non Laverda's

Offline DoC!

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2011, 07:24 »
Hi Paul,
Those brushes look like, to coin a well used phrase of mine 'the dog's bollocks'.
I really like the idea of being able to cut them back to new when the existing brush is knackered.
Thanks
DoC!
2x Red Laverda Jota 120 1982, Red RGS 120 1984, Black (and gold) Corsa 120 1984, Blue Series 2 572cc Atlas. Wee Red 124cc Uno. Another 124cc Uno in boxes.
Black Honda Blackbird 1100.

BEER: Helping ugly people like Cosi have sex since 1892! :)

Offline henry

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2011, 21:49 »
but constant use will 'refinish' the castings to a non original factory finish thereby ruining the originality and knocking $$$$$$ off the value!
There are two sets of principles. They are the principles of power and privilege and of truth and justice. If you pursue truth and justice it will always mean a diminution of power and privilege. If you pursue power and privilege it will always be at the expense of truth and justice. Noam Chomsky

Offline Paul LeClair

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Re: So how the heck do YOU clean your engine in situ?
« Reply #29 on: October 23, 2011, 03:04 »
Hi Paul,
Those brushes look like, to coin a well used phrase of mine 'the dog's bollocks'.
I really like the idea of being able to cut them back to new when the existing brush is knackered.
Thanks
DoC!

Hi DoC!

the vendor was great to deal with, the product is absolute top notch, and they last and last and last while continuing to do a great job. I expected to get the most use out of the metal bristle brushes, and I do get a lot of use out of them, but I use the nylon bristle bushes a lot more than I expected, they get into all the small nooks and crannies for a really thorough clean. I have used both the metal bristle brushes and the nylon bristle brushes with all kinds of nasty chemicals and solvents, nothing has adversely affected them, and they continue to do a really great job. I am really happy with this vendor and his products.

Paul LeClair
Paul LeClair
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
79 1200 Mirage, 82 1200 Mirage, 84 RGS Executive, and various non Laverda's